Category

Cloud Capacity

Compute Utilization Efficiency (High Load)

Newvem continuously monitors servers’ CPU load and notifies on high CPU loads.  We consider an average CPU load of 80% and above as a high load. As high CPU load can lead to a major service availability risks, which results in service degradation. In order to protect the system one should consider changing the instance size or implementing a different scaling method. We suggest that you either:

  • Scale up your computer instances – vertical scaling; move your workload to larger servers.
  • Scale out your compute instances – horizontal scaling; use additional servers.
  • Auto-scaling – AWS offers the ability to dynamically and automatically scale up or down according to conditions you define. With Auto Scaling, you can ensure that the number of Amazon EC2 instances you’re using increases seamlessly during demand spikes to maintain performance, and decreases automatically during demand lulls to minimize costs. Auto Scaling is enabled by Amazon CloudWatch and available at no additional charge beyond Amazon CloudWatch fees.

Compute Utilization Efficiency (CPU Load)

Newvem continually monitoring your servers CPU load and notifies you on high loads. High-load lead to a major down time risk, you might need to consider changing the instance type or implement a different scaling method. We consider an arbitrary of 80% CPU load and above as an high load and suggest that you scale up or scale out your compute instances (i.e. move your workload to larger servers or use additional servers).

 

Keywords: compute utilization efficiency, CPU Load, Newvem

How Cloud Computing Will Change IT: 6 New Predictions - CIO Blog

IT is in a time of disruptive transition, caused by the rise of cloud computing. CIOs are in the midst of a maelstrom, and—like Ulysses, the fabled hero from Homer’s Odyssey—are torn between the Scylla of established IT practices and the Charybdis of the future, both of which loom dangerously and portend trouble. Also like Ulysses, many CIOs must inure themselves to the din of tempting Sirens: the vendors who sing a sweet song of painless cloud transformation, made possible by the purchase of some software, or hardware, or a set of cloud services.

Scale IT !

The practice of shaping demand to fit the available resources can be found for example in transportation businesses, where airlines charges more for their service when demand is high and charge less to encourage more demand. In the real-time and interactive on-line world,  the challenge is to ensure that capacity meets demand.

The following diagram shows 3 cases of over capacity, under capacity and on demand capacity, which the latter can be achieved only by taking an advantage of the cloud elasticity.

Cloud Capacity Part 1: Basics

Capacity planning is described by Wikipedia as the “process of determining the production capacity needed by an organization to meet changing demands for its products.” It is also given by the following formula:

(number of machines or workers) × (number of shifts) × (utilization) × (efficiency)

The IT capacity plan is derived from the current and future resources utilization for holding, storing and accommodating the software services. It is a given fact that servers’ average utilization in the traditional data center is between 5% and 20%. By contract, when planning capacity in the cloud, the basic working assumption is that, utilization should match the demand at all times and support temporary demand peaks and future trends.

In his CIO’s article about cloud computing capacity, Bernard Golden wrote,

Hitchhiker's Guide to The Cloud

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